Watch: Traditional Craftsman Keeps 'Egg-Shoeing' Alive At Easter In Hungary

  • 8 Apr 2021 11:34 AM
Watch: Traditional Craftsman Keeps 'Egg-Shoeing' Alive At  Easter In Hungary
Once considered the ultimate test of skill for a blacksmith, this 19th century tradition is kept alive by Gyula Laszlo and a few other artisans in Hungary. 

“I always say that I got infected by this and not by drugs. ...I cannot be cured,” Laszlo told Reuters.

He continues, “I have seen old photos of how blacksmiths did this... They put the shoe only on one side. I thought the bare end of the thread did not look nice, so I decided to put shoes on both sides. All you need is perseverance, and perhaps a little dexterity.” 

Check out the video below to know more and to see him in action.

Source:
Reuters

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